Thursday, December 5, 2013

Getting a Job in Ireland - MORE!

Over the past few months, I have had a number of queries regarding the possibility of getting a job in Ireland.  I've covered this area a number of times on the Blog, but perhaps I should take a moment to re-emphasize a few points.

Pockets of Opportunity: Recently, Anonymous wrote the following to me: "Hi TOM.. I have done my BCS(Bachelor in Computer Science) and i have 1 year and 6 months experience of Software Quality assurance Engineering in Pakistan. I'm planning to come Dublin. im planning that i will complete my Masters there and then i will tryu to find a job. Can you please tell me that what are chances of getting a job in my IT field and what are chances of getting a job during study in restaurants,hotels etc? Please reply, i'm waiting."

First, good hearing from you, Anonymous. Second, if you're going to seek employment here, first thing's first - make certain that any written communication is as perfect as you can make it. Check spellings and grammar. Remember that first impressions count. I'm afraid that your recent post to this blog was loaded with typos. But to answer your question:

Depending on your qualification, you could indeed find many opportunities in this country. IT, as mentioned in other posts, is rebounding with many companies seeking staff. As also mentioned, Ireland - for whatever reason - now finds itself positioned as the 'Silicon Valley' for the rest of Europe. Pick a major IT company either in the software or physical infrastructure space (think LinkedIn, Facebook, Google, Dropbox, IBM, EMC, HP...the list goes on and on) and they're not only based in Ireland, but are actively hiring.

Right to Work: But remember that if you're a non-EU citizen you do not have the automatic right to work in Ireland. Instead, you must get a job permit.  However, should your skills be in demand, a future employer can facilitate that for you. If, on the other hand, you are looking for work in an industry that is still in recession and that has an over-supply of available talent, the chances of getting a work permit are slim.

Which brings me to the second part of your question, Anonymous. You ask what the chances are of getting a job in a restaurant or hotel. And the answer is, I'm just not too certain how successful you might be. Remember that Ireland is still in recession and still with a high unemployment rate. Many of the unemployed are in the 18 - 25 year old age group, and many of those people are possibly in college, hoping to get a part time job just as you are. Consequently, I'm afraid that you'll be facing stiff competition. Too, because you won't have a work permit, you will not be able to take a 'legal' job here. Contact the the Irish Department of Justice, or talk to your Irish college or university, for more information.Your questions are also answered extensively in my book, A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland. See below for details.

A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2015 Kindle Edition Now Available!
If this blog interests you, then you might want to know more about living and working in Ireland. Are you thinking of traveling to Irelandmoving to Irelandworking in Ireland? Do you want to understand what makes the Irish tick, how you can get a job here, and how to survive in this wonderful country? If so, consider purchasing the 2015 Kindle edition of A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland. Over 11,000 have already done so! Now over 85,000 words long, this book could make the perfect gift for those interested in this wonderful country. Simply click on any of the above links to purchase the new 2015 Kindle edition. You can also download free apps to read the Kindle version on any PC or Mac. 

68 comments:

  1. Thanks You. Your blog is very helpful.
    What if someone has rights to work during study? Normally, 20 hours are allowed to work in a week for student.

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  2. That should work. But if I were you, I'd contact the university administration/ admissions department prior to your move here just to make sure. Happy New Year - Tom

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  3. Thank you Tom.. Happy New Year. May this new year brings happiness in your life.

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  4. Hi Tom, I am deepak. i am graduated in mechanical engineering but do not have any work exp. i am thinking about doing Msc from Dublin institute of Technology in logistics and supply chain management.plz tell me that what chances i have of getting a job after the completion of my course.also tell me is DIT a reputed university? the agency through which i am planning to go is very much confident about the jobs.
    plz give me your valuable advice,
    thanks in advance.
    dpks2010@gmail.com

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  5. Hey Deepak and good hearing from you. First things first: Yes, DIT is a reputable university and turns out great graduates. I have a number of friends who have graduated from, or taught, there and they have only good things to say about it. That said, remember that it is a Technical Institute, not a university. Something to think about! As to getting a job here: Deepak, I am NOT an authority in your area. I googled logitics and supply chain management jobs Ireland and came up with a tonne. By all means, google too! I did find the following link that should help: http://www.irishjobs.ie/Supply-Chain-Logistics-Jobs. But suspect that if you look, you'll find many more websites with other opportunities. Good luck! Tom

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  6. Hello Tom, I am Sandra from India. I have done bsc in computer science. I am planning to apply in Shelbourne College Dublin for IT Graduate Level diploma Level 6. After that I will complete my masters with top up from any universities which are offering. What u thinks it is a good idea to do master like that? And will it do any impact on job opportunities that I have done Diploma from a college and then done masters degree with top up? Please suggest regarding this.

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  7. Good morning Sandra and good to hear from you. You seem like a very motivated individual and as we all know, personal motivation is the most important key to success! So good for you. Regarding your questions: 1. Masters Degree - I'm assuming that you'll take your MSc in an IT-related field. I can't see how it would hurt your career prospects, but would only enhance them. I learned a long time ago that educational achievement is one thing people can't take away from you no matter what happens in your life. Once you've earned it, it's yours forever. So yes, I do think it's a good idea. Which leads me to 2) Yes, a Masters degree will have a very positive impact on job opportunities. Ireland is now a mecca for the computer industry. Pick a blue chip company and they're looking for talent: Google, EMC, Facebook, Twitter, IBM, Microsoft and so many more - all of these great companies have operations in Ireland. And they're looking for talented people to help produce a stream of new products and services: engineers to help create new cloud-based infrastructure; software types to help write new code; pre- and post-sales consultants and staff to spec solutions, to deploy them, to service them. If you have language capabilities in addition to English, so much the better. All I can advise is Go for It! Wishing you luck and joy in your search... Tom

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    1. Hi tom,
      I completed my master in IT in india and i hold a work permit from ireland. the query is if my sponsor allow me to work anywhere in ireland then i can work with other firm or not??

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  8. Hi Tom, I'm current working in Ireland as Green Card Holder. I'm here with my wife and she's looking for job over here. As far as I know she can apply for spouse work permit when having a offer. Her background is more in Sales and Makerting. Can you please advise which career she can pursuit here? Thanks a lot

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  9. Hi Tom: I'm a career executive assistant who has been supporting senior executives for over 20 years; I'm obviously not a young kid fresh out of college! I am able to obtain the necessary work permits since my grandmother was born in Ireland, but I'm most concerned about finding work. My husband and I want to relocate but I'm not ready to retire, and he will be able to work remotely for his current company.

    How difficult do you suspect it will be to secure an administrative position? What's the ageism situation in Ireland? Thanks in advance for your help!

    Cheers,

    Nan

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  10. Morning Nan. You ask simple questions but answers are more complex. The unemployment rate is falling and many new opportunities are being created particularly in the Greater Dublin Area. At its deepest point in the recession, published unemployment rates stood at 15%; its now down to 12% so things are turning around. But competition for jobs is still high, with hundreds of people applying for any job.That said there are opportunities out there so as you know, all it takes is gumption and persistence.

    Re: Ageism - yep, it exists here. I'm no spring chicken myself. I make my crust by writing for business, particularly in technology, and know that I'm competing with many bright young things fresh out of college with excellent credentials. So I'll tell you what I've been told; rewrite your resume (CV) to emphasize your experience, not your age. Emphasize any international experience you might have (Ireland is a gateway between the US and Europe, remember, and Irish businesses are also pushing into China and Russia looking for opportunities). Also point out how organizational / communications skills (all those years!) will contribute to success.

    Do take a look at the jobs links on the right hand side of this blog. Or Google 'Ireland Jobs Senior Executive Assistant'. I did that just now and was led to http://www.irishjobs.ie/Senior-Executive-Assistant-Jobs where I saw a number of opportunities that might be appropriate to you.

    Good luck and stay in touch! Tom :)

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  11. HI ,

    I am a prospective Masters student and looking to do my Masters in Data analytics from National college Ireland.

    I have 5 plus years of experience in warehousing and business intelligence and have worked for UK clients in India

    I am 31 year old and wanted your advice

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  12. Morning Mudassar. And I think you're on the right path. Anything to do with 'Big Data' is going nuts, and much of the infrastructure is being developed and marketed from Ireland. For instance: EMC is hiring like crazy. They have a large Fab in Cork County, and also support sales from there. Ireland is also home to VCE (think Vblock) and VMware. And that doesn't even touch on the stuff coming out of HP, etc.

    The master's is a great path to all of this. If interested, check out the Cork Institute of Technology (CIT) based in Cork, of course. They've partnered with EMC to produce Cloud engineers - and EMC is scooping them up. Go to http://www.cit.ie/currentnews?id=222 for a 2011 article on this, but if I were you I'd mine additional info. Sure do wish you the best... - Tom

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  13. Hi,

    Thanks for your help over blog.

    I am Rakesh form India; I have finished my masters in Internet systems at Blekinge University of Technology, Sweden. I have 6+ years of solid experience in Microsoft Technologies like C#.net, Asp.Net, SharePoint, Silverlight etc. I am very much interested to work and live in Ireland. I have applied to hundreds of jobs through Irishjobs.ie, jobs.ie, makeitincork.ie many more, but I am not getting any feedback then after. I hardly get one or two responses saying my CV is not successful for processing.

    I strongly believe my experience and expertise are more than suitable for the roles which I applied. Am I doing it in wrong way or because I don't have valid work-permit/Green card or is there any other reason.

    Please advise me how to find a job.

    Thanks
    Rakesh

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  14. Dear Rakesh - you're not alone in hearing nothing but silence after applying for a job via the internet. Irish employers can be down-right rude when it comes to responding to job queries. I've had similar experiences over the years, as well as quite recently, and it drives me crazy.

    My advice as follows: the Irish are a social lot. They respond much better to personal requests via phone or face-to-face then they ever will to an internet query. What I suggest is this: first, I'd check out inexpensive methods to telephone Ireland from India. For example, Skype could offer a way of phoning Ireland for next to nothing.

    Second: pick one or two major job recruiters. Telephone them, ask for an account exec that handles IT. Give them not only your background, but the frustrations that you're encountering. Try to establish a relationship by taking their name / email address. Following your talk, make sure you immediately email a thank you and "If you don't mind, can I keep in touch regarding any job that comes up which requires my skill?" Then do exactly that. Email or telephone them every month.

    In Ireland, persistence counts. Keep going and you stand a greater chance of landing that job that you're looking for. Good luck! Tom

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    1. Hi Tom,

      Thanks for quick replay, Calling them would be good idea as you said, I will try to call them rather mailing.

      Is there any job portal that posts jobs with work permit/Green card sponsorship? Is there any way I can find job with sponsorship?

      Thanks.
      Rakesh

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  15. Hey again. And to answer your questions: to my knowledge there is no job portal focusing on green card / work permit sponsorship. In my case I had to 'prove my value' in an interview against other applicants for my employer to be willing to sponsor me. I suspect that hasn't changed. I wish you so much luck! Tom

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    1. Hi Tom,

      How are you? How about coming to Ireland on Interview/tourist visa and finding a job? How difficult is that? What are the funds we have to show for visa processing to cover living expenses for 3 months of stay?

      Does companies will consider face to face interview for who don’t have valid work permit?

      Please suggest me your Ideas.

      Thanks
      Rakesh

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  16. Hi Tom, I am looking for a factory job, or a construction job in Ireland. Are my chances good? I am an American I should point out.

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  17. Hi Tom, I would love to live in Ireland. However I am an American, I am looking for a construction, of factory job. How hard would it be to live the rest of my life in Ireland?

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  18. Hi Chad. This is a tough one and I suggest you troll thru other areas within this Blog. First of all, we're still in the middle of recession. Traditional manufacturing (excluding IT and Pharma) have taken it in the neck. Construction is rebounding but very slowly with many workers from that sector still on the dole queues. So finding a job in these sectors is going to be tough. Second, as an American you require a work permit to work in Ireland. These 'green cards' are available, but only within sectors experiencing skills shortages (think medicine). So I'm afraid it's going to be an uphill battle.

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  19. Hi Tom,
    Greetings to you. My name is Preeti, am from India. I am a mature student, planning to pursue MBA in Information Technology from Dublin Business School. With regards to my qualification, I have completed Post Grad Diploma in Hospitality & Tourism Management from Niagara College, ON in 2010. Post the graduation, I worked in some Restaurants, and some other company for about one year. Prior to my PG Diploma, I worked as a Sr. Executive Asst. in a software company for some Senior Execs for 15 years.

    I have had a desire to gain knowledge in IT field and be employed as IT professional. I understand it would be challenging to study with youngsters but I would like to put in my best to build a dream goal. Could you please advise me if I am going right and would there be chances of getting job in Ireland for a matured student like me in IT companies. Appreciate your response.

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  20. To my knowledge anyone coming to Ireland on a tourist 3 month visa does not have to show funds. They're tourists after all. And yes, companies will consider face-to-face interviews without a work visa. But it's up to you to show them that you have the skills, aptitude, and attitude to succeed. Good luck!

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  21. Hi, Tom,
    First thank you for supporting this forum for those of us trying to navigate moving to Ireland. I am curious about professionals and how to go about even looking for work. The key seems to be in actually finding a job and then the paperwork comes after. I am an American with multiple degrees BS, MA, PhD and want to relocate to Ireland. Any advice on how to navigate the job hunt.

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  22. Morning Anonymous and hope you're well. This blog is peppered with advice (take a look at other articles and posts). But quickly: a) Ireland is definitely coming out of its recession though it is a slow process; b) companies in specific industries (Pharma, IT, and now construction of all things) are looking for qualified people. Obviously, demand will depend on your skills. c) As a US national, you DO NOT automatically qualify for a work permit. Instead, you must prove that you fill a skill's shortage. To make it a bit more daunting d) you must also interest an employer first who in turn will sponsor the work permit.

    So...it's a bit of an uphill struggle. You can try any of the Irish jobs links (see URLs at right of the blog and also simply google) BUT - evidence indicates that employers are less likely to hire based only on contact via a URL. Instead, you must do what you can from that distance to form a relationship. Consequently, best thing to do is contact prospects by email then follow up with phone calls. And keep bugging them. Squeaky wheel still works. And if you can do it, best best thing is to do what you can to line up some interviews then get over here. It won't be cheap, but your aspirations require some risk-taking I'm afraid. Good luck. Tom

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  24. Good morning Emmanuel and good to hear from you. With regards to your questions: First, what is a sensitive topic - you mention 'dark skin' which alludes, I suspect, to worries that you might have regarding bigotry in this part of the world. If this is the case: Yes, like anywhere the people here can be afraid and / or suspicious of those that are different from them. Certainly, when I moved here as an American - though with white skin (not that skin colour should make ANY difference) - I ran into some barriers because of my nationality and different accent. But in most cases Ireland's people have become more accepting. This is due, I think, to the many immigrants from all nationalities, all religions, all skin colours that have come to this country. So on that front, and while you may run into the occasional fool here, rest easy.

    With regard to a part time job while studying: it's very, very competitive out there. But if you are persistent, and as humble and pleasant and skilled as your email suggests, I suspect you'll pick up something or other.

    Next: employment. As you say - and you are right in this assumption - ICT workers are in great demand. It seems that every day a company based in this country is announcing the creation of new jobs. Therefore: I truly believe that the probabilities are good that a) you'll get a job and your company will sponsor your green card and b) that job will be reasonably paid, if not well paid.

    Wishing you well - Tom

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  25. Hah! I could fill your ears for days. Best advice: be confident in your skills and your person; be humble; ask for advice when you don't know (the Irish love giving advice); and most importantly - be yourself. And yep, I agree. That Big Fella upstairs has it all planned for you (and me too). Now all we have to do is do the work. Blessings...

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  26. Hi Tom. It's great to read through your pieces of advice to people aspiring to be a part of Irish workforce. I find your advices very valuable and accurate. Firstly, let me introduce myself. I am Rod and I have graduated with a Doctorate degree from UCD and with 10 years experience in scientific research. Like many of the non-EU finding their luck in landing a job in Ireland, I had gone through an uphill battle I, myself, had to go through an uphill battle but my job hunting was unsuccessful despite my qualifications, efforts, dedication and persistence. I had even applied to simple desk jobs but to no avail. I am still covered by the Irish Third Level Graduate Scheme having completed my level 10 degree in Ireland. This scheme will allow me to look for a job in Ireland and, if successful, will allow me to upgrade my visa status to green card 'without' sponsorship. But because of many unsuccessful attempts in trying to find a job, I had to return to my home country because of financial reasons. I have completely stopped looking for opportunities in Ireland because the economic climate there at the moment is not suitable to secure a job especially if you're a non-EU. I had also recently found out that in many occasions, most employers in Ireland would prefer an unskilled Irish fresh graduate than a skilled non-EU with obviously have most, if not all, of the qualifications they are looking for. This is mainly because of work permit reasons and in some cases, ignorance. What I have been doing instead is to apply for independent research grant to continue my research career in Ireland. If successful, this will provide me with a temporary contract until I can establish my self as an independent researcher. It is still a a daunting task but it is the most plausible way that I can get a job for myself without relying to employers. Thanks Tom.

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  27. Dear Anonymous: your post is GREATLY appreciated. Rarely do I - or the readers of this blog - gain such valuable insight from a person who has been there, done that, and tried so hard. If okay with you, I think I'd like to write a complete separate entry using your email as the subject. Ignorance indeed! Based on what I've read, Irish employers have missed a huge opportunity in not hiring you. I wish you so much good fortune. Tom

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  28. Hi Tom: I know you get asked this what I'm sure seems to be a million times, however I was hoping you would be able to assist me with the million and one more time! I have 10 years in customer service, with 4 years in an very large American hospitality company, 3 years of the 4 working in NYC and am currently an Event Specialist/Sales Coordinator. As many have posted on here, I am very interested in working and living in Ireland however have learned from many sources (including your blogs) that hospitality professionals from the US can't get work visas however if I stayed with my current company who has properties and offices in Ireland, what would my chances be to obtain a position in Ireland? Any assistance or guidance would be greatly appreciated! Thank you in advance. Best, Meredith

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  29. Hi Meredith - I entered a reply but for some reason it didn't stick so I'll try again. Yes, working with your existing company sounds like the best bet. As you know, all you need is a work Visa as this is required by non-EU nationals. If you can convince your present company to apply for one on your behalf, that's all you'll need. Good luck and let me know what happens! Tom

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  30. Thanks for posting this good article, I need this because I am applying for a job in other country. I already found an Australian employment and I think my application there was effective. I hope that I can now work on that place.

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  31. Glad you found it useful, James. Wishing you so much luck... Tom

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  33. Hi Tom,

    Thanks alot for the information, it surely helps. I m based in India, i work as a software tester with 3 years 9 months of experience.
    My husband currently studies Masters in IT at NUIG, hence i m also looking for a move there to Ireland. I have been applying for Software Tester jobs since 3 months now. I have applied through agencies and directly through companies. But what i generally hear is - agencies say they do not help wit work visa and to directly contact the companies & the companies say contact agencies. This leaves me very confused!

    However, I have been told by many agencies that if i had a spousal visa they could get me a job easily as my skill sets are good. And they also ask me to apply for spousal visa. Now in my knowledge i know that i can get spousal visa once my husband is working. Please feel free to correct me.
    I m eagerly looking for move to Ireland. Is it that Non EU citizens are not preferred fo jobs? This search is becoming frustrating now, kindly help me.

    Hope you have a great Christmas!

    Thanks advance.
    Cherry

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  34. Hi Cherry. And to answer your question: Yes, EU citizens are facing increasing challenges getting a job. The reasons, however, are somewhat complicated.

    First, in getting a job here, you're facing an economy with a current unemployment rate of over 10 percent. All those Irish people are looking for jobs. Many in the tech sector. Second, universities are graduating many highly qualified students who are also looking for jobs.

    Irish employers are trying to minimize risk. One of the ways they do so is by hiring local people. The reason? They worry that immigrants might leave soon. Or will be too expensive or inflexible. This is unfounded, of course, but is an emotional response to the current situation.

    Ireland is also, on some levels, a Tribal country. A village. The Irish tend to protect their own. When I moved over here in 82, and despite endless efforts, it took me three months to land a job - low paid though it was. And I was here!

    As I've written elsewhere in this blog, the best way to get a job here is by trying to form a relationship with agencies and potential employers. From India, the only way to do this is by phone or Skype. Which is difficult.

    The other way - and it carries much higher risk - is to simply get over here and start looking. Companies here are much more likely to hire you when they can see you - and when you have an opportunity to sell your skillsets to them face to face.

    I wish you so much luck on your journey.

    Tom

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  35. Hi Tom,

    Hope you can give me some advice. I am working and living in South Africa, have more than 22 years IT experience in designing and developing software. I'm currently a Solution Architect and looking to relocate to Ireland. I also have a formal qualification.

    I am already in contact with one company in Ireland with regards to an available position. I know talking to only one company isn't going to be enough, unless they offer me the position. My plan is to come over to Ireland and see if I can secure face-to-face interviews. I have applied for a few jobs on-line, but not a lot of companies have replied to my application.

    I do not have the luxury of taking more leave, so I will have to take the risk of resigning my current job and come over for a few months to see if I can secure a job offer. South Africans can come over to Ireland for 3 months without a Visa just as a visitor.

    Just a note: I won't work until I receive a job offer and have received my work permit.

    I have two questions:

    1. What do you think my chances are as an experience IT professional getting a job offer within 2 to 3 months?

    2. Will Irish companies invite me for interviews if they know I still have to apply for a work permit? Or do they ignore people without a work permit in general?

    Charles

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  36. Hi and good hearing from you. My general observation: you're in a good position. But let's explore that comment. First, do you mind asking: who are you working for right now?

    IT solutions architects (and related skill-sets) are in huge demand right now. EMC, just as an example, has been hiring like crazy (how are you in virtualized environments?) God knows how long this is going to last but your timing seems good.

    Another comment: Irish employers are simply LOUSY at responding to job applications. It's rude and it's horrible but that's the way it is. Now to your questions:

    1. I think you stand a good chance. As I say, demand is, I'm told, large and growing. That said, don't hold me to it. Your'e taking a giant risk my coming over here...I did the same thing. It took me 3 months to get a job (back in 82) and those days were scary times for me. But with your experience, I suspect you'll beat the odds.

    2. Work permit - the same thing applies. If a company wants you they'll get the work permit sorted out. Mind you, they will focus on EU / local applicants first (they did the same thing when I came over from the States) which is only fair. But the IT sector is so hot right now... I think you'll be okay.

    Can I ask you a favor? Let me know how it goes and keep in touch. Wishing you well - and lots of luck. Tom

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  37. Hi Tom....your advises are really great....I wanted to know whether project management or technical expertise would give more options for job opportunities in Ireland for non-EU nationals

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  38. The answer of course is: YES. Depending, also of course, on your area of technical expertise. Sentiment is driving increased exports - and domestic sales - of Irish goods and services. Irish companies are gearing up to meet that new demand, and need people with the right skills to execute. Hope this helps.

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    1. Thanks Tom...I have completed my PMP and have 11 yrs exp in software industry...so do u suggest to take up technical certifications to enhance the chance of getting more opportunities.

      Delete
  39. Oy! First, I am NOT a technical guy at all. Second, I have no idea how certification might help your career prospects. All I can tell you is this: software Cos based in Ireland are actively hiring. Get on the Net. Take a look at jobs. (see right hand side panel on this blog for some Job URLs). See what skills they might be looking for. Then... maybe PHONE one of them. Talk to an HR person. Ask that same question. See what they say. And then... action the advice and go get 'em. Wishing you luck.

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  40. hello,

    Thanks for this site! great info

    I am moving with my husbnad to Dublin next month. He has an Intra company transfer dependent work permit ( 2 years), so i cant have dependednt/spousal work permit( as it is only applicable to spouse of critical/green card holder)
    I ahve done BS in IT and MBA in marketing and Finance. I have 3.5 years of experinece with HP as business research. what are my chances of getting a job and more than that getting a sponsership for that.

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  41. Good morning! And I'm afraid you ask the 24,000 dollar question. Compared to even 12 months ago, your chances of finding employment are good. The IT industry, as you know, is crying out for skilled staff. You background at HP (despite their current troubles) will be a definite bonus. The MBA (I have one too) will help so something to also emphasize. Do take a good look at your Resume (CV here if you didn't know), polish it up to emphasize particular skillsets (sales, solutions advice, - and emphasize any cloud experience you had - a hot topic here too) and away you go. Not sure about sponsorship...all you can do is what I did: try to form relationships when you get here and be persistent! Good luck. Tom

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    1. Thanks Tom for your promt reply. really appreciate!!
      do you know any consultants who can help in getting sponsers?

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    2. Hi again. Off-hand, the answer is no I don't. What I recommend is: Google 'jobs in Ireland' to locate a good head hunting firm. Some of those are listed on the Right Hand Side of this Blog. They should be able to help. Go get 'em! :)

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  42. I just scanned thru these comments and I mainly saw IT career comments. Tom, do have advice for someone looking for environmental career. I'm a Hydrologist looking to see if I can find a job in ireland. Not sure how to start this search. Any guidance? Lisa

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  43. Hi and... First: I've not a clue about Hydrology and plead ignorance. That said: I just googled Hydrology jobs Ireland. I didn't see anything but don't really know what I'm looking for. All I can tell you is: do your research. Find out via Google which companies are involved in that area. Google some more. Then reach out. Phone the companies! It doesn't cost much via Skype any more. Keep going and good luck.

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  44. I have read your blog it is very helpful for me. I want to say thanks to you. I have bookmark your site for future updates.
    หางาน สมัครงาน

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  45. Surely glad it helps. I've been up to my eyes on a project and haven't posted in awhile. But hopefully will get more up here soon! Take good care Rami. Tom :)

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  46. Hi Tom, I recently discovered your blog and had a few questions about jobs for American attorneys. I spent the last 2 summers studying in Oxford and was able to add on a total of 8 weeks in Ireland. I absolutely fell in love with the country and the people. I will graduate from a Texas law school in May of 2016 and take the bar in July. What would I need to do to try and gain employment in Ireland? My main focus areas are property and tax law; I could possibly gain a master's of Law in tax by adding an additional semester. Is this an area overly saturated in Ireland? Thanks. Elizabeth

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  47. Morning Elizabeth. To answer your question re: demand for lawyers - to be honest I have no idea. I do know that the demand for accountants is picking up as the economy recovers. If this is the case it seems to me that the demand for tax / property lawyers will also increase, particularly as the property market recovers (commercial property is doing particularly well right now). Do take a look elsewhere in this Blog for various posts on requirements for a work permit. Also, simply google IRELAND LAWYERS JOBS (and try solicitors too) to see what happens. Then reach out to them with a good Resume / CV, phone anyone who seems to have a reasonable opportunity, and nicely keep pestering. Good luck! T

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  48. Afternoon, Manuela. The good news of course is that as an EU national (and I LOVE Italy!) you have every right to live and work in Ireland. Finding a teaching job could, however, prove a bit more difficult.

    The Great Recession caused the Irish government - in their crazed lack of wisdom - to significantly cut funding for schools. Teachers' salaries, pensions, and general school funding were decimated. However, the good news is that the economy is recovering and budgets are being restored. I'm not a teacher (did a bit of part time lecturing for 3rd Level) but I know that demand for teachers will depend on a number of factors: your area, age group, geographic location, and similar.

    I'd start simply by Googling: teaching jobs Ireland. I just did that and came up with a number of URLs. I spotted one that looks interesting: http://www.educationposts.ie/ Do try that as a starting point and let me know how you get on. Good luck to you! Tom

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  49. Hi Tom, You have a very informative blog here.

    I have a question, if you could be kind enough to let me know your thoughts on this.

    I am planning to come to Ireland for higher studies and have shortlisted the following courses/universities/colleges:

    1. M.Sc. Cloud Computing - National College of Ireland
    2. M.Sc in Big Data - Letterkenny Institute of Tech.
    3. Higher Diploma in Computing - University of Limerick

    In terms of job prospects, say both during studies (part-time) and after studies which course/university as per you from the above list is a good combination.

    Also, I guess the location matters too. Dublin I am sure is the sought after as there must be more part-time opportunities but am not sure so shooting this question at you. And how is Letterkenny and Limerick in that sense?

    Moreover I am into IT with total 11 years of experience, at present working as a SQL Developer.

    Looking forward to your reply.

    Thanks

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  50. Hey Pop, and good to hear from you. To be honest, I'm not quite sure which is the best choice. All that you mention are solid institutions and all would lead to good jobs. And at this point I wouldn't be too worried about the location - Ireland is so small it makes no real difference. I suspect that the most important consideration is what YOU want to do. I write for Big Data and Cloud as a marketing guy (case studies, etc). Both areas are going nuts. Now that you've short listed (and it all seems terrific) go where you're head and heart tell you. So many good wishes to you! Tom

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  51. Hi Tom, Thanks for the super-prompt reply.

    I did check the no. of vacancies both for Big Data and Cloud and as suspected there are more for big data. For Cloud I could not find many. Me being a developer not sure how cloud computing would help me grow in my career. I guess it would be a career change as cloud is more to do with infrastructure.Please correct me if I am wrong.
    What is your personal opinion, if you have to choose one as a career path, which one should it be.

    Also, regarding location, say for a part-time job. Would it not be easier to get one in Dublin as against Limerick and Letterkenny? Am I correct here?

    Thanks

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  52. Hey again. Forgive short response - it's Sunday but I'm under deadline pressure. So here goes:

    1. Big Data v Cloud - I suspect I'd go Big Data. Seems to be more opportunities. So many apps (and / or new versions) are being developed to mine Big Data for MIS and Business Analytics purposes. Hey, though, I'm no expert let me tell you! I can say that I'm writing quite a bit for this area, which indicates strong activity / interest.

    2. Location - of the 3 areas you mention, Letterkenny is 'smaller' and would probably have fewer opportunities. Limerick seems once again to be growing with many IT co's in the area. Dublin is, of course, the largest. So many blue chips ave moved in (eBay, PayPal, Google, FB, MicroSoft to name only a few). But those opportunities are offset by the high cost of living in the area. Rents are ENORMOUS! My son lives there (he just finished his PhD in Irish and is a lecturer / administrator at a private University) and I'm astonished how much he pays for a small apartment.

    Anyway hope this answers some concerns. Hang in there! And good hearing from you. T :)

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  53. Hello Tom, thanks for your reply and sorry for bothering you on a Sunday.

    I might just head either for Limerick for Higher Dip in Software Dev. or to Letterkenny for Big Data. Dublin, course + accommodation quite expensive and I am not seeing the benefit as I already have IT experience. I am sure I should get something in part-time even in LetterKenny.

    Will get in touch as and when I land in your country.

    Take care, thanks for your replies and have a good Sunday ahead..

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  54. Hi Tom, Greetings for the day!!! I am Vishnu from India and really eager to Purse master in Sustainable Energy in UCD or UCC and I was looking for blogs like yours and I had recently found this. . I really appreciate your unconditional support and great suggestions. I had gone throughout your blog and never came across questions related to fields like Energy and Electrical job prospectives.
    I would like to seek some information regarding these fields and their opportunities in Ireland.I would be very grateful if you could answers few question as follows?
    1. How good are opportunities in this field and what are basic requirements?
    2.What about any part-time jobs while pursing my course?
    3.which is the best university and are there any on-campus requirements?
    Please help me with the following and appreciate any more information.
    Regards
    Vishnu

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  55. Good morning Vishnu. And as to your questions regarding Sustainable Energy: frankly, I have no idea what this sector is doing in Ireland. I DO know that many architects and builders are adopting sustainable energy methods. And they're building all sorts of wind farms around. But other than that - I simply don't have the info. Might I suggest that you start Googling various job sites (and fundamentals) to research this area? You'll see a couple of links on the RHS of this blog. Good luck!

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  56. Hello Tom,
    My name is Toyin and I am currently residing in the United States (I am a citizen). I visited Dublin lat year and loved it. I currently work in operational finance and have about 6 years of experience. I also have my master's degrees in mathematics and accounting.

    My question to you is - how easy would it be for me to relocate to Ireland and the possibility of finding employment?

    Thank you for your time.

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  57. Hi Toyin and thanks so much for your message. Just out of curiosity, where do you live? Sure hope you're okay over there... Anyway:

    Your query got me thinking and I've decided to write a new Post specifically focusing on the rules regarding working and residing in Ireland. Please see today's post for more information. Generally, however, I think you'll have a good shot. The financial markets here are rebounding rapidly. My only fear for you is if Mr Trump enacts a new 15% corporate profits tax as he's promised. This could possibly undermine 'foreign' American financial services in this market. However....

    To start please see the right hand side of the Blog. There I list a number of URLs for specific job websites. Too, simply Google some key phrases: Financial services jobs in Ireland, for example. Wishing you all sorts of luck. Tom

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  58. Hello Tom,

    I am working as a software engineer in IBM from 4 years and I wish to pursue Msc in computer science in data science or cloud computing domain in ucd,tcd or ucc colleges. I am just worried about the work placement after the completion of course.My question is how easy will it be for me to find employment in a reputed company?
    Thanks in Advance
    Regards,
    Neelam

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  59. Good morning Neelam and good hearing from you. You're asking the million dollar question: will your MSc efforts pay off with a good job? Okay: let's take a look. First, the IT job sector seems to be growing nicely. I understand that the demand for computer science professionals continues on an upward trajectory. Cloud, of course, is all the rage and a number of companies - everyone from IBM to Dell EMC - continues to look for staff. Too, new companies are continually being established in Ireland, and demand IT personnel as part of their strategy. Second: I'm not certain where you live. Do make sure you're entitled to Work and Live in Ireland. See my latest post for more information - it provides a complete list. Finally, do check out Irish employment URLs. I have a partial list on the right hand side of the blog. Or Google! I just entered "IT help wanted in Ireland" and Google came back to me with any number of URLs. I wish ye luck! Tom

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  60. Thank you Tom and I must say that you are doing a wonderful job in helping and guiding people. Kudos :-)

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  61. Many thanks Neelam. Go get 'em! Tom :)

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