Saturday, January 21, 2017

Meeting the Demand for IT Jobs

Most weeks I receive a question or two from people looking to come to Ireland hoping to study, work, and live. I thought I'd post my response here hoping other folks might find it of benefit.

The questions, received this morning, are:


 
Hi,

I am planning to take masters in ireland. I got an offer from NCI in MS cloud computing. I have also applied to Univ of cork and Trinity, waiting for them to revert with a confirmation.

Sir can you please share me the Job market in IT sector ? competition will be high ?
Even if I land up in a job in IT sector , will I be able to get a PR.

Awaiting for your response.

The Answers:
 First - congratulations to this person on your offer from NCI (National College of Ireland). It's a great school and I surely hope you'll enjoy the experience. And I must say I wish you luck with the University of Cork and Trinity. You might look at CIT (Cork Institute of Technology) which also has a fine IT programme.

Too, your choice of studying for an MS in cloud computing seems to me to be spot on. So many companies are hiring in this area. After all, cloud computing is a burgeoning area of growth, and companies simply cannot find enough qualified people to keep up with their requirements.

With regards to your questions: "Can you please share with me the job market in the IT sector in Ireland?  Answer: do a simple Google trawl. This morning I used only one key phrases: IT CLOUD COMPUTING JOBS IN IRELAND. Google came back to me with any number of pages. Here's just one: http://www.irishjobs.ie/Cloud-Computing-Jobs. Take a look and you'll see a good few opportunities on this page alone. Take a look at the other links and you'll find any number of great prospects.

You ask if competition will be high? The answer is Yes, of course it will. But not for the reasons you might expect. Right now there is a shortage of skilled IT personnel in Ireland. Companies seem to be falling all over themselves to attract the right people. But the key phrase here is: "The right people." They're looking for smart, motivated, hard-working folks who will bring needed skills to fill a resource gap. And I'm certain that if you study hard and connect with people and companies during your studies, you'll do just fine.

Finally you ask about Permanent Residency. That's tougher but not impossible. I suggest you go to a previous post I've written to answer this question. Go to: http://survivingireland.blogspot.ie/2016/11/getting-job-and-living-in-ireland-trump.html for more information. Too, when you start your studies Career Guidance people at your college or university will be able to help.

Wishing you so much luck!

Tom

A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Kindle Edition Now Available!

If this blog interests you and you want to learn more about Ireland why not consider purchasing A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Edition. Are you thinking about living and working in Ireland? Would you like to move to Ireland? Do you want to know how to get an Irish work visa in this country? Do you need to know how Brexit and Trump policies may affect your plans? If so, consider purchasing the 2017 edition of A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland by Tom Richards. Now almost 90,000 words long, this book could make the perfect gift for  those interested in this wonderful country. Over 14,000 people have now learned how to live, laugh, and drink like the Irish by reading this Kindle ebook. I hope you enjoy, and my very best - Tom




Thursday, January 19, 2017

Brexit Slams Irish Food and Drink Exports to the Tune of €570 million in Lost Potential Sales

Ireland is caught in an economic vice. Brexit hasn't even happened yet and already the Irish economy is feeling the bitter winds inbound from just over the Irish Sea.

A few days ago, Bord Bia - that wonderful state agency responsible for monitoring Ireland's food and drink industry - reported that the fall in the value of Sterling has already wiped out €570 million in potential exports within this industry. That's a hell-of-a-lot of euro. (see RTE reporter George Lee's article on additional downsides due to Brexit). What's shiveringly possible is: the spectre of Brexit could result in yet another wave of unemployment sweeping into this country.

The impact of Brexit is difficult to fully predict. We do not yet know if the United Kingdom will push tariffs on a variety of products down our throats. If they do prices of Irish exports into the UK will skyrocket, further dampening the suddenly fragile Irish economic recovery. The government is taking some action by pro-actively consulting with Irish exporters. Many companies here depend largely on UK exports to make a profit and survive. The Irish government is suggesting it's time to diversify to other nations in order to mitigate risk. However, gearing up to serve the needs of other countries can be a relatively long process. In the meantime, those employed by Irish companies who are dependent on Britain as a key export market are going to have to take a huge breath and cross their fingers, hoping they'll be able to keep their jobs as the ramification of Brexit becomes clearer.

Job Opportunities Due to Brexit

But all is not lost. Ireland is still hiring big-time within key industries. It turns out that Brexit may have a silver lining after all. Many UK-based companies, fearing a loss of free-trade movement throughout the EU, are considering a relocation to Ireland. For that reason, legal, accounting, and professional services could see a significant rise in employment opportunities.

Other industries are also gearing  up despite - or because - of Brexit. Folks with skills in digital marketing, engineers of all types, pharmaceutical specialists, guys and gals with experience in global sales and marketing, IT, nurses and doctors, people with construction experience - all are still in great demand.

So much so that many companies are recruiting Irish citizens who left this country to immigrate abroad during the bad years in order to survive. Today, businesses are reaching out to the great Irish diaspora, hoping to lure many of these people back home to fill their skills shortages.

So yes. The impact from Brexit will certainly shake Ireland's economy and the job prospects that go with a recovery. But - the uncertainly of Brexit could also deliver more opportunities to this country.

For more information take a look at a December article by The Irish Examiner. A thoughtful - and hope-filled - piece.

A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Kindle Edition Now Available!

If this blog interests you and you want to learn more about Ireland why not consider purchasing A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Edition. Are you thinking about living and working in Ireland? Would you like to move to Ireland? Do you want to know how to get an Irish work visa in this country? Do you need to know how Brexit and Trump policies may affect your plans? If so, consider purchasing the 2017 edition of A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland by Tom Richards. Now almost 90,000 words long, this book could make the perfect gift for  those interested in this wonderful country. Over 14,000 people have now learned how to live, laugh, and drink like the Irish by reading this Kindle ebook. I hope you enjoy, and my very best - Tom



Thank You for 105K+ Visits

When I started this blog in 2009, and if I'm honest, I did so for a fairly simple reason. Since moving to Ireland in 1982 many of my (mostly) American friends kept asking me the same questions over and over again:

"Why in God's name did you ever move to Ireland? You must have been mad!"

"Can I move to Ireland too? Like, I mean, it's simple, right?"

"How can I get a job in Ireland? I'm sure all I have to do is show up, don't I?"

"Ireland must be so quaint! Do people still use donkey carts to get around?"

The simplicity (and complete lack of knowledge) behind some of these questions could only make me smile. Anyway, I got tired of answering the same questions and in a moment of knee-jerk response started this blog. The results have been beyond my wildest dreams.

This morning, the statistical tools of this simple humble blog hit 105,000 unique visits. That's a heck of a lot a visitors and I'm glad you didn't show up at my small house in Eyeries all at once. I'm certain I would have run out of tea, coffee, beer, and anything else I can think of.

So thank you. Thank you for visiting. Thank you for your support. And as always: if I can answer a question let me know. I'll get back to you and do my best to point you in the right direction.

With my very best regards to all of you,

Tom
Eyeries, Beara, County Cork Ireland

A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Kindle Edition Now Available!

If this blog interests you and you want to learn more about Ireland why not consider purchasing A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Edition. Are you thinking about living and working in Ireland? Would you like to move to Ireland? Do you want to know how to get an Irish work visa in this country? Do you need to know how Brexit and Trump policies may affect your plans? If so, consider purchasing the 2017 edition of A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland by Tom Richards. Now almost 90,000 words long, this book could make the perfect gift for  those interested in this wonderful country. Over 14,000 people have now learned how to live, laugh, and drink like the Irish by reading this Kindle ebook. I hope you enjoy, and my very best - Tom

Saturday, December 31, 2016

In 2017, Why Not Visit Us in Eyeries? We'd Love It

I don't think I've ever mentioned it but here where we live, in the small village of Eyeries, way out on the Beara Peninsula in Southwest Ireland (just about as far southwest as you can get), we run a small tent camping operation. And when I say small, I mean small.

Each summer we turn the back garden into a campground. Visitors from all parts of the world make their way here mostly by foot, bicycle and even kayak (yes, we've had visitors come to us that way). God knows how they hear about us or learn that we even exist. We don't advertise nor do we want to. Most see the small sign which hangs on the front of the house. These poor souls, usually exhausted by their staunch efforts of journeying to Eyeries, often set up tents in the backyard, then stagger the few feet up the hill to Causkey's, our local pub, for much needed refreshment.

Not many stay with us. And frankly that suits us just fine. That way we can spend real time getting to know the people who live in our garden if only for a night or two, and along the way we've made so many friends - guys and gals travelling on their own from Holland or Germany. Couples hiking the Beara Way along the coast who came from South Africa and made it over the rugged hills between us and the coastal village of Allihies further down the peninsula. The older couple from New Zealand who stayed with us for two nights, went on their way, then came back to us a few nights later because they missed it so much.

We've had families from Dublin and painters from France. College students taking a break from their studies in Spain, and retired people visiting from England. We've had Americans, Canadians, Egyptians, folks from Israel, Scouts from Switzerland, a bunch of German lads who sent us bottles of Pilsner when they returned home to thank us, and even a family from the Isle of Man who unfortunately did not bring along their Manx cat. All are people with good hearts and good tales of their travels, and each one has provided us with a memory we cherish.

People like Johan (pictured above), a Dutch traveller on a bicycle who landed in Dublin and made his way down, down, down into the Southwest to finally land on our doorstep to spend some time with us. Fully rested, he continued his tour around Ireland. His trip was obviously rewarding. Only today, on this final day of 2016, he sent us a video of his travels.

What a trip! And if you want to see what you could be enjoying on a visit such as Johan's' simply view his YouTube slide show by clicking here.

Sometimes I forget how fortunate we are to live in Eyeries. The people who visit with us constantly remind me of the natural glories which surround us: The startling views of nearby Coulagh Bay in the first light of dawn. The shrill voices of gulls crying as they circle overhead, gliding on the soft winds without effort. The curtained gales which march in from the west, blasting the village in a ferocious frenzy.

Then the sunset, and a glory rarely beheld. Only to be bettered by the darkness of the night. The sky bejewelled in a million glittering pin drops of starlight. The Milky Way a gossamer curtain painted with a telling brush across the firmament. Sometimes, standing in that quiet, I truly believe I can reach up  through the night sky and touch the face of God.

That's what it's like, living here in Eyeries. We don't have to travel far to be one with nature. Instead, we live in it. I guess that's what people remember when they visit us. They remember the humbling views of the Bay and the soft evening song as birds fall asleep. They remember, I think, the starkness of the white cumulus clouds rolling overhead. They also remember the people of this small village nestled between rocky hills and a vast ocean. And for a moment I like to think that we can all simply breath.

Thank you for visiting us, Johan. Thank you everyone who has visited with us and stayed in our small back garden. We hope your travels here have given you peace. Certainly, you all have given us memories to treasure.

I hope many more will visit us in 2017 and for years to come. Tom :)    For more information on Eyeries by all means go to www.eyeries.ie.http://www.eyeries.ie

A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Kindle Edition Now Available!

If this blog interests you and you want to learn more about Ireland why not consider purchasing A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Edition. Are you thinking about living and working in Ireland? Would you like to move to Ireland? Do you want to know how to get an Irish work visa in this country? Do you need to know how Brexit and Trump policies may affect your plans? If so, consider purchasing the 2017 edition of A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland by Tom Richards. Now almost 90,000 words long, this book could make the perfect gift for  those interested in this wonderful country. Over 14,000 people have now learned how to live, laugh, and drink like the Irish by reading this Kindle ebook. I hope you enjoy, and my very best - Tom




Friday, December 30, 2016

2017 Edition of A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland now available!

2017 EBOOK KINDLE EDITION NOW AVAILABLE! 

A Survivor’s Guide to Living in Ireland by Tom Richards gives you the insight you need  to move, work, and visit Ireland. 

Come for a week – stay for a lifetime! That’s the lure of Ireland. Essential reading for anyone considering a move or visit to Ireland. 6th edition! Over 14,000 copies already sold! 

How will Brexit and Trump’s presidential policies affect your plans to move and work in Ireland? Are you entitled to an Irish Work Visa? If so how can you get one? Is Ireland the land of your dreams? Have you ever thought of staying for a prolonged visit, establishing residency, or creating an Irish business? Have you ever wondered what it would be like to live in Ireland? Find out in this rich volume of almost 90,000 words devoted to the ever-changing tapestry of living and working in Ireland. This fun, easy to read book contains (among other things) a brief history of Ireland, the opportunities present here for would-be immigrants, and tips on how to get a work permit, become a citizen, buy a home, cope with taxation and the cost of living, and enjoy this amazing country for yourself. As an added bonus, a Dictionary of Irish Slang and Phrases is also included! 

In 1982, American Tom Richards, fresh out of UCLA, took a four-week holiday in Ireland. He’s been here ever since. Witty and insightful, Tom tells how he overcame the culture shock of living in the Ol’ Sod, learning to twist his middle-class American thinking into a more European point of view while managing to pay his bills at the same time. Along the way, he’s learned some practical lessons that he now shares: From how to understand the Irish to how to drink a perfect pint; from finding a job to how to get a work permit; from purchasing your fist dream home to learning to take soaking walks on a soft Irish day. 

Here, he reveals that to survive in Ireland all you have to do is discover the magic of this wonderful country for yourself. A Survivor’s Guide to Living in Ireland has already sold over 14,000 copies. With it you can learn to Talk like the Irish, Drink like the Irish, Work like the Irish, and Live like the Irish. Essential reading for anyone considering a visit or move to this fabulous country.

A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Kindle Edition Now Available!

If this blog interests you and you want to learn more about Ireland why not consider purchasing A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Edition. Are you thinking about living and working in Ireland? Would you like to move to Ireland? Do you want to know how to get an Irish work visa in this country? Do you need to know how Brexit and Trump policies may affect your plans? If so, consider purchasing the 2017 edition of A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland by Tom Richards. Now almost 90,000 words long, this book could make the perfect gift for  those interested in this wonderful country. Over 14,000 people have now learned how to live, laugh, and drink like the Irish by reading this Kindle ebook. I hope you enjoy, and my very best - Tom

Thursday, November 10, 2016

Getting a Job and Living in Ireland: The Trump Effect

The backlash from Trump’s recent win was anticipated. Yet I’m astounded at the tidal wave of queries I’ve received about working and living in Ireland from American’s who are more than a little perturbed by the election's outcome.

Due to simple demand, I’ve put together a list of rules and websites that should answer a couple of often-asked questions: As an American, can I get a job in Ireland and live there? If so, how do I go about that process?

Before moving to these answers I would encourage any would-be immigrant to pause for a moment, take a deep breath, and reflect on what such a move might entail. Having lived in this country for 34 years now, I will be the first to tell you that an immigrant’s life is hard work. Though the Irish speak English, don’t think for a minute that the culture will be the same as what you experience in Peoria Illinois, Walnut Creek California, or Boston Massachusetts. This is a fascinating country of contradictions: a wonderful people who can still be deeply misunderstood by outsiders simply because you’re not Irish and have not grown up here. Depending on where you live, you might feel the place insular and foreign. Loneliness due to separation from friends and family is common. Making a living here can be difficult even with a good job because taxes are high and the cost of living even higher.

But I make no bones about it: despite the difficulties I’m happy with my life here. Even happier when I think of what may happen to my fellow countrymen and women in Trump’s ‘Great America’. If you’d like to know more about living the life of an immigrant in Ireland you might want to read my book, A Survivor’s Guide to Living in Ireland which gives much deeper insight. 

With that out of the way, let’s move on to the rules for getting a job and residency in this fine country. As I’ve alluded, over the past two days I have seen a spike on this Blog of Americans wishing to move to – and work in – Ireland. For that reason I found it prudent to post this guide. However, first a warning: this is only a guide. Make sure you do your own research for accuracy because employment and residency legislation can change instantly. A good place to start for general information is: http://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/moving_country/moving_to_ireland/working_in_ireland/coming_to_work_in_ireland.html

The Rules
In general, visitors to Ireland are allowed to stay in this country for 90 days. During that time they are not allowed to work. To live and work here for a longer period, there are a number of rules and requirements:

·         For non-EU citizens: Ireland is a member of the European Union. Citizens of EU member states are legally entitled to work and live in Ireland. Non-EU nationals do not have this right and must instead jump through many hoops.

·         If you are a foreign, non-EU student and studying in Ireland on an approved course: you may take up casual work without an employment permit, but only a maximum of 20 hours per week.

·         Working holiday agreements: Ireland has reciprocal agreements with a number of other countries including the United States, allowing non-EU nationals to stay in Ireland for longer than 90 days and work here. To do so you must apply for a Working Holiday Authorization. For more information go to https://www.dfa.ie/travel/visas/working-holiday-visas/

·         If you have Irish ancestry: Ireland has a ‘grandfather’ law. That is, if you can prove that your parents or grandparents were Irish you have the right to Irish citizenship. With citizenship comes the right to live and work in Ireland and anywhere in the EU. For more information go to http://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/moving_country/irish_citizenship/

·         Employment permits: Ireland has 9 types of employment permits. Some allow non-EU nationals to work and live in Ireland: General Employment Permits are usually considered for occupations with an annual remuneration of €30,000 or more. Critical Skills Employment Permits are available in a number of categories. To apply, the prospective employee must have a job offer. Upon receiving a permit your family will usually be eligible to join you. Go to http://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/employment/migrant_workers/employment_permits/green_card_permits.html for more information.

·         Obtaining Irish citizenship through marriage: foreign nationals who are married to Irish citizens can apply for naturalization. For more information go to http://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/moving_country/irish_citizenship/becoming_an_irish_citizen_through_marriage.html

·         Obtaining residency through civil partnership: if you can prove you are in a long-term relationship with an Irish citizen, you are legally allowed to apply for long-term residency.

·         Retired and desiring to reside in Ireland: you may be granted permission to reside in Ireland for the longer-term if you can prove that you have: an annual income equal to €50,000 per annum and; savings equal to the cost of buying a home in Ireland and; comprehensive private Irish-based medical insurance. If you can prove that you will not become a burden to the state you can apply for longer-termed residency. For more information go to http://www.inis.gov.ie/en/INIS/Pages/non-eea-permission.

      Gaining long-term permission to live and work in Ireland if you are not an EU national is tough work but not impossible. If you haven’t been to Ireland make sure you visit first. Check out the place. See if you think you can fit in and survive in Ireland as I have. If your answer is yes, if you are determined and focused, you could well end up living the Irish dream just as I have. I wish you so much luck. 

A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2015 Kindle Edition Now Available!
If this blog interests you, then you might want to know more about living and working in Ireland. Are you thinking of traveling to Irelandmoving to Irelandworking in Ireland? Do you want to understand what makes the Irish tick, how you can get a job here, and how to survive in this wonderful country? If so, consider purchasing the 2015 Kindle edition of A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland. Over 11,000 have already done so! Now over 85,000 words long, this book could make the perfect gift for those interested in this wonderful country. Simply click on any of the above links to purchase the new 2015 Kindle edition. You can also download free apps to read the Kindle version on any PC or Mac. 

Sunday, November 6, 2016

Organic Gardening in Ireland: One Yank's New Life in the Soil

Organic gardening in Ireland has become more and more popular as people look to grow their own vegetables and fruit. Studies show that organically grown food has more minerals and nutrients than food grown with pesticides – and taste better. Growing organically can also cut the cost of food bills while helping to protect the health of those consuming them.

Since relocating to the beauty of West Cork Ireland, this erstwhile Yank has tried his hand at the organic life. Having never before grown a sausage, I’ve put three planters in my small back garden which overlooks the Atlantic, filled ‘em with soil, sewn in a goodly amount of local cattle dung, and prayed. 

The resulting crops of Irish spuds (usually Roosters), onions, strawberries, carrots, lettuces, and rhubarb – though of small quantities – give me immense satisfaction. And what a great result considering I really don’t know what I’m doing.

However, I’ve been in luck. On a recent trip to the United States I happened upon a fellow American who happens to be an expert in organic gardening. D. Keith Crotz, an American living in the great U.S. State of Illinois, has devoted much of his life to this area. With a Botony and History of Science degree from the University of Illinois (Champaign), then Graduate School at Southern Illinois University, Keith first worked as a botanist at one of the world’s greatest museums, Chicago’s Field Museum.

During the late 70’s and early 80s, his interest in growing green was piqued by attending a number of organic farming conferences. After that he started selling garden books, and developed a passion not only for organic growing but also for the preservation of America’s heritage seeds. During that recent stay in America we had the opportunity to chat a bit about the budding organic gardener in all of us – and he proffered a few tips, as well.

“Organic gardening allows the small gardener the opportunity to work with their soil using only those natural materials at hand,” Keith says. “Green manuring and composting are satisfying to the soil – and the soul.”

Keith points out that one of the most difficult disciplines a newbie organic gardener must learn is the art of crop rotation and fallow ground. “It’s important to let a planter and its soil rest,” he explains. “Cover crop the soil and plant Daikon Radish in the Autumn. It’s a natural soil buster that will break down the soil in the garden throughout Fall and Winter. In spring don’t plant anything else for that season but instead let it rest. Or as an alternative, you could plant an annual clover.” 

For those starting out he suggests keeping it simple. “Even a five foot by five foot area will do,” Keith explains. “Start with a tomato plant and a pepper plant. Because you’re in Ireland, do think of a lazy bed for some potatoes. Add a row of green beans, a few lettuces, and maybe some turnips and peas. It’s one of the reasons, I think, that I garden: I get to say ‘Lettuce, turnips and pea!”

Keith recommends using a good spading fork or a broadfork to break up and prepare the ground before planting. “I recommend digging a small plot with the five by five dimensions I’ve mentioned so root crops and new plants can get deep into the soil. The broadfork in particular can be expensive so borrow one if you can!”

Which is exactly what I intend to do. Now that the last of the rhubarbs have died away, and the late spuds lifted, I’ll take Keith’s advice and find a broadfork to borrow. As winter approaches, you’ll find me in my planters, preparing the garden for next year’s crop, making sure to keep one fallow to let the soil rest a bit. Thank you, Keith for this expert advice!

Books On Botanical
For a list of rare and out of print books on everything Botanical, go to Keith’s website, The American Botanist Booksellers, www.amerbot.com.

American Seeds
And while we here in Ireland are not legally permitted to buy bulbs or living plants from outside the EU, we can legally bring in seeds from most anywhere in the world. If you’d like to try your hand at some American seeds visit Keith and his online Seed Savers Exchange by going to http://www.seedsavers.org/special/online-exclusives

If this blog interests you, then you might want to know more about living and working in Ireland. Are you thinking of traveling to Irelandmoving to Irelandworking in Ireland? Do you want to understand what makes the Irish tick, how you can get a job here, and how to survive in this wonderful country? If so, consider purchasing the 2015 Kindle edition of A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland. Over 11,000 have already done so! Now over 85,000 words long, this book could make the perfect gift for those interested in this wonderful country. Simply click on any of the above links to purchase the new 2015 Kindle edition. You can also download free apps to read the Kindle version on any PC or Mac.